The Spotted Nightjar calls when dingo pups are born: ecological and social indicators in Central Australia

Turpin, Myfany, Ross, Alison, Dobson, Veronica and Turner, M. K. (2013) The Spotted Nightjar calls when dingo pups are born: ecological and social indicators in Central Australia. Journal of Ethnobiology, 33 1: 7-32. doi:10.2993/0278-0771-33.1.7

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Turpin, Myfany
Ross, Alison
Dobson, Veronica
Turner, M. K.
Title The Spotted Nightjar calls when dingo pups are born: ecological and social indicators in Central Australia
Journal name Journal of Ethnobiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-0771
Publication date 2013-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2993/0278-0771-33.1.7
Open Access Status
Volume 33
Issue 1
Start page 7
End page 32
Total pages 26
Place of publication Denton, TX, United States
Publisher Society of Ethnobiology
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Across cultures there are known signs that signal the availability of certain foods, predict the weather or warn people of impending events. In Central Australia the call of the spotted nightjar (Eurostopodus argus) signals the time when dingo pups are born. This article identifies indicator events known by speakers of the Arandic languages in Central Australia. Indicator events can be described as the presence or behavior of a particular species or phenomenon that signals some other species or phenomenon. Arandic people group these into five broad domains: indicators of food, water, weather, danger and news (e.g., an imminent visitor). A diverse range of ecological, meteorological and human (bodily) phenomena serve as indicators, with birds being the most prevalent. This study explores the basis of indicator events, finding both an ecological and cultural basis for many signs. It also draws attention to the significance of the indicator relationship in terms of how people make sense of co-occurring events around them. We also consider some implications for natural resource management and phenology.
Keyword Ethpoor lithology
Indicator events
Australian Aborigines
Indigenous ecological knowledge
Knowledge
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 11 Aug 2013, 00:10:46 EST by System User on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures