Embodied understandings, affective pedagogies: ‘doing’ Cultural Studies in the classroom’

Olive, Rebecca (2012). Embodied understandings, affective pedagogies: ‘doing’ Cultural Studies in the classroom’. In: Cultural Studies Association of Australasia Annual Conference (CSAA 2012), Sydney, Australia, (). 4-6 December 2012.

Author Olive, Rebecca
Title of paper Embodied understandings, affective pedagogies: ‘doing’ Cultural Studies in the classroom’
Conference name Cultural Studies Association of Australasia Annual Conference (CSAA 2012)
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 4-6 December 2012
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Oral presentation
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Cultural Studies theories and approaches no longer sit solely within Arts and Humanities. As a cultural studies postgraduate in The University Queensland, School of Human Movement Studies (HMS), I tutor in a number of subjects that engage students in critical cultural, sociological and historical understandings of sport in Australia, including two subjects core to HMS degree programs. However, the students themselves are commonly focused on vocations in physiology, nutrition, medicine, physiotherapy, psychology, biomechanics, sport science and more, with consistently strong and passionate commitments to the role of sport and physical activity in society. These students are (at least initially) taking socio-cultural subjects compulsorily, and struggle to see the relevance of cultural theory to their vocational aspirations so making the socio-cultural course-content accessible and relevant to them during tutorials is a challenge. As a tutor, I have little control over assessment and course design, however I have been able to draw on Cultural Studies literature that centralises bodies, experiences and affect in troubling how we know the world. For example, Probyn locates processes of pedagogy in how we experience shame and the affects of shameful experiences on our lives, arguing ‘that shame compels a rethinking of how we conceptualize the everyday as it is lived’ (2004 p. 328). In this way, bodies and embodied experiences have become key to tutorial discussions by ‘bringing to life’ cultural and sociological concepts for students more used to ‘doing’ than ‘thinking’. This approach allows students to (gently) feel the concepts as we discuss them in class, rather than simply conceive of them, by explicitly drawing on personal experiences and memories.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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