Postgraduate clinical psychology students' perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy stress management intervention and clinical training

Pakenham, Kenneth I. and Stafford-Brown, Johanna (2013) Postgraduate clinical psychology students' perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy stress management intervention and clinical training. Clinical Psychologist, 17 2: 56-66. doi:10.1111/j.1742-9552.2012.00050.x


Author Pakenham, Kenneth I.
Stafford-Brown, Johanna
Title Postgraduate clinical psychology students' perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy stress management intervention and clinical training
Journal name Clinical Psychologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1328-4207
1742-9552
Publication date 2013-07
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1742-9552.2012.00050.x
Volume 17
Issue 2
Start page 56
End page 66
Total pages 11
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background Research into stress management interventions for clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) is limited, despite evidence indicating that these individuals are at risk for elevated stress, which can negatively impact personal and professional functioning. This study explored: (1) CPTs' perceptions of a previously evaluated Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) stress management intervention; and (2) their satisfaction with clinical training and suggested programme changes.

Methods Fifty-six postgraduate clinical psychology students completed questionnaires. Qualitative and quantitative data concerning students' views of an ACT stress management intervention and clinical training were collected.

Results Most CPTs reported that they would recommend the intervention to other CPTs and that they found it personally and professionally useful. The majority of participants also reported marked improvement on indicators of psychological flexibility. Qualitative data suggested three broad structural changes to clinical training (better preparation prior to commencing clinical work, reduced workload, and better organisation), some of which have implications for curriculum development.

Conclusions Findings support the use of an ACT stress management intervention for addressing CPT stress and the integration of self-care into the curriculum.
Keyword ACT
Clinical psychology training
Self-care
Stress management
Mental-health professionals
Self-care
Program directors
Medical-students
Mindfulness
Impairment
Distress
Psychotherapists
Trainees
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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