Effects of a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention (CanChange) on health and behavioral outcomes in survivors of colorectal cancer: a randomized controlled trial

Hawkes, Anna L., Chambers, Suzanne K., Pakenham, Kenneth I., Patrao, Tania A., Baade, Peter D., Lynch, Brigid M., Aitken, Joanne F., Meng, Xingqiong and Courneya, Kerry S. (2013) Effects of a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention (CanChange) on health and behavioral outcomes in survivors of colorectal cancer: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 31 18: 2313-2321. doi:10.1200/JCO.2012.45.5873


Author Hawkes, Anna L.
Chambers, Suzanne K.
Pakenham, Kenneth I.
Patrao, Tania A.
Baade, Peter D.
Lynch, Brigid M.
Aitken, Joanne F.
Meng, Xingqiong
Courneya, Kerry S.
Title Effects of a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention (CanChange) on health and behavioral outcomes in survivors of colorectal cancer: a randomized controlled trial
Journal name Journal of Clinical Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0732-183X
1527-7755
Publication date 2013-06-20
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.45.5873
Volume 31
Issue 18
Start page 2313
End page 2321
Total pages 10
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Society of Clinical Oncology
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose Colorectal cancer survivors are at risk for poor health outcomes because of unhealthy lifestyles, but few studies have developed translatable health behavior change interventions. This study aimed to determine the effects of a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention (CanChange) on health and behavioral outcomes among colorectal cancer survivors.

Methods In this two-group randomized controlled trial, 410 colorectal cancer survivors were randomly assigned to the health coaching intervention (11 theory-based telephone-delivered health coaching sessions delivered over 6 months focusing on physical activity, weight management, dietary habits, alcohol, and smoking) or usual care. Assessment of primary (ie, physical activity [Godin Leisure Time Index], health-related quality of life [HRQoL; Short Form–36], and cancer-related fatigue [Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue Scale]) and secondary outcomes (ie, body mass index [kg/m2], diet and alcohol intake [Food Frequency Questionnaire], and smoking) were conducted at baseline and 6 and 12 months.

Results At 12 months, significant intervention effects were observed for moderate physical activity (28.5 minutes; P = .003), body mass index (−0.9 kg/m2; P = .001), energy from total fat (−7.0%; P = .006), and energy from saturated fat (−2.8%; P = .016). A significant intervention effect was reported for vegetable intake (0.4 servings per day; P = .001) at 6 months. No significant group differences were found at 6 or 12 months for HRQoL, cancer-related fatigue, fruit, fiber, or alcohol intake, or smoking.

Conclusion The CanChange intervention was effective for improving physical activity, dietary habits, and body mass index in colorectal cancer survivors. The intervention is translatable through existing telephone cancer support and information services in Australia and other countries.

Clinical trial information: ACTRN12608000399392.
Keyword Quality-of-life
Risk-factor interventions
Coronary-heart-disease
Physical-activity
Breast-cancer
Commitment therapy
Vegetable consumption
Style intervention
Acceptance
Exercise
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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