Distant mesenchymal progenitors contribute to skin wound healing and produce collagen: evidence from a murine fetal microchimerism model

Seppanen, Elke, Roy, Edwige, Ellis, Rebecca, Bou-Gharios, George, Fisk, Nicholas M. and Khosrotehrani, Kiarash (2013) Distant mesenchymal progenitors contribute to skin wound healing and produce collagen: evidence from a murine fetal microchimerism model. PloS One, 8 5: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0062662


Author Seppanen, Elke
Roy, Edwige
Ellis, Rebecca
Bou-Gharios, George
Fisk, Nicholas M.
Khosrotehrani, Kiarash
Title Distant mesenchymal progenitors contribute to skin wound healing and produce collagen: evidence from a murine fetal microchimerism model
Journal name PloS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-05-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0062662
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 5
Total pages 9
Place of publication San Francisco, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The contribution of distant and/or bone marrow-derived endogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to skin wounds is controversial. Bone marrow transplantation experiments employed to address this have been largely confounded by radiation-resistant host-derived MSC populations. Gestationally-acquired fetal MSC are known to engraft in maternal bone marrow in all pregnancies and persist for decades. These fetal cells home to damaged maternal tissues, mirroring endogenous stem cell behavior. We used fetal microchimerism as a tool to investigate the natural homing and engraftment of distant MSC to skin wounds. Post-partum wild-type mothers that had delivered transgenic pups expressing luciferase under the collagen type I-promoter were wounded. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was then used to track recruitment of fetal cells expressing this mesenchymal marker over 14 days of healing. Fetal cells were detected in 9/43 animals using BLI (Fisher exact p = 0.01 versus 1/43 controls). These collagen type I-expressing fetal cells were specifically recruited to maternal wounds in the initial phases of healing, peaking on day 1 (n = 43, p<0.01). This was confirmed by detection of Y-chromosome+ve fetal cells that displayed fibroblast-like morphology. Histological analyses of day 7 wounds revealed vimentin-expressing fetal cells in dermal tissue. Our results demonstrate the participation of distant mesenchymal cells in skin wounds. These data imply that endogenous MSC populations are likely recruited from bone marrow to wounds to participate in healing.
Keyword Marrow-derived cells
Bone marrow
Stem cells
Maternal blood
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # e62662

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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