Could intra-tendinous hyperthermia during running explain chronic injury of the human Achilles tendon?

Farris, Dominic James, Trewartha, Grant and McGuigan, Miranda Polly (2011) Could intra-tendinous hyperthermia during running explain chronic injury of the human Achilles tendon?. Journal of Biomechanics, 44 5: 822-826. doi:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2010.12.015


Author Farris, Dominic James
Trewartha, Grant
McGuigan, Miranda Polly
Title Could intra-tendinous hyperthermia during running explain chronic injury of the human Achilles tendon?
Journal name Journal of Biomechanics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9290
1873-2380
Publication date 2011-03-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2010.12.015
Volume 44
Issue 5
Start page 822
End page 826
Total pages 5
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Chronic tendinopathy of the human Achilles tendon (AT) is common but its injury mechanism is not fully understood. It has been hypothesised that heat energy losses from the AT during running could explain the degeneration of AT material seen with injury. A mathematical model of AT temperature distribution was used to predict what temperatures the core of the AT could reach during running. This model required input values for mechanical properties of the AT (stiffness, hysteresis, cross-sectional area (CSA), strain during running) which were determined using a combination of ultrasound imaging, kinematic and kinetic data. AT length data were obtained during hopping and treadmill running (12 kmph) using ultrasound images of the medial gastrocnemius (50 Hz) and kinematic data (200 Hz). AT force data were calculated from inverse dynamics during hopping and combined with AT length data to compute AT stiffness and hysteresis. AT strain was computed from AT length data during treadmill running. AT CSA was measured on transverse ultrasound scans of the AT. Mean±sd tendon properties were: stiffness=176±41 N mm−1, hysteresis=17±12%, strain during running=3.5±1.8% and CSA=42±8 mm2. These values were input into the model of AT core temperature and this was predicted to reach at least 41 °C during running. Such temperatures were deemed to be conservative estimates but still sufficient for tendon hyperthermia to be a potential cause of tendon injury.
Keyword Ultrasound
Tendinopathy
Tendon mechanics
Hysteresis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 20 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 03 Jul 2013, 14:50:25 EST by Dominic James Farris on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences