Strength in vulnerability: The effects of psychosocial factors on subjective well-being and housing outcomes for women who are homeless

Margaret Hughes (2013). Strength in vulnerability: The effects of psychosocial factors on subjective well-being and housing outcomes for women who are homeless Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Margaret Hughes
Thesis Title Strength in vulnerability: The effects of psychosocial factors on subjective well-being and housing outcomes for women who are homeless
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-07-01
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Dr. Genevieve Dingle
Total pages 171
Language eng
Subjects 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract/Summary Women comprise approximately half of Australia’s homeless population. The most common reasons for women’s homelessness are intimate partner violence and family violence. The aim of the current research was to examine the interpersonal trauma experienced by homeless women within a psychological framework. Maladaptive schemas regarding self and others and difficulties in emotion regulation were hypothesised as consequences of the homeless women’s histories of violent trauma. These ongoing psychological impacts of trauma in conjunction with perceived social support as a potential buffering factor were expected to predict homeless women’s subjective well-being and housing outcomes. Using a longitudinal design, 63 women living in Specialist Homelessness Services were interviewed and completed questionnaires, once when residing at the service and again approximately one month after leaving the service. The majority reported traumatic histories (88.89%) and prior episodes of homelessness (71.43%). At outcome, 29.5% of the women were living in stable independent housing and there was an 8% increase in subjective well-being as measured by the Personal Well-being Index-Adult (International Wellbeing Group, 2006). Aspects of traumatic histories and prior episodes of homelessness were significantly associated with schemas and emotion regulation. Lack of emotion awareness predicted lower subjective well-being and lower levels of housing stability at outcome. Schemas predicted lower subjective well-being at outcome and this relationship was mediated by perceived social support. Perceived social support predicted greater subjective well-being. The results suggest that the psychological impact of prior traumatisation significantly affected the homeless women’s perception of social support and subjective well-being. The findings also provide some evidence that the psychological impact of traumatisation affected the women’s ability to achieve stable housing. A Trauma-Informed Care model of case management for homeless women is supported by these results.
Keyword Subjective well-being
Housing outcomes
Homeless women

 
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Created: Mon, 01 Jul 2013, 06:18:55 EST by Margaret Hughes on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences