What roles do contemporaneous and cumulative incomes play in the income-child health gradient for young children? Evidence from an Australian Panel

Khanam, Rasheda, Hong Son Nghiem and Connelly, Luke B. (2014) What roles do contemporaneous and cumulative incomes play in the income-child health gradient for young children? Evidence from an Australian Panel. Health Economics, 23 8: 879-893. doi:10.1002/hec.2961


Author Khanam, Rasheda
Hong Son Nghiem
Connelly, Luke B.
Title What roles do contemporaneous and cumulative incomes play in the income-child health gradient for young children? Evidence from an Australian Panel
Journal name Health Economics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1099-1050
1057-9230
Publication date 2014-08
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/hec.2961
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Issue 8
Start page 879
End page 893
Total pages 15
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract The literature to date shows that children from poorer households tend to have worse health than their peers, and the gap between them grows with age. We investigate whether and how health shocks (as measured by the onset of chronic conditions) contribute to the income-child health gradient and whether the contemporaneous or cumulative effects of income play important mitigating roles. We exploit a rich panel dataset with three panel waves called the Longitudinal Study of Australian children. Given the availability of three waves of data, we are able to apply a range of econometric techniques (e.g. fixed and random effects) to control for unobserved heterogeneity. The paper makes several contributions to the extant literature. First, it shows that an apparent income gradient becomes relatively attenuated in our dataset when the cumulative and contemporaneous effects of household income are distinguished econometrically. Second, it demonstrates that the income-child health gradient becomes statistically insignificant when controlling for parental health and health-related behaviours or unobserved heterogeneity.
Keyword Australia
Child health
Chronic conditions
Income gradient
Panel data
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Economics Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 26 Jun 2013, 13:14:13 EST by Chesne McGrath on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital