Standardising trauma monitoring: the development of a minimum dataset for trauma registries in Australia and New Zealand

Palmer, Cameron S., Davey, Tamzyn M., Mok, Meng Tuck, McClure, Rod J., Farrow, Nathan C., Gruen, Russell L. and Pollard, Cliff W. (2013) Standardising trauma monitoring: the development of a minimum dataset for trauma registries in Australia and New Zealand. Injury: International Journal of the Care of the Injured, 44 6: 834-841. doi:10.1016/j.injury.2012.11.022


Author Palmer, Cameron S.
Davey, Tamzyn M.
Mok, Meng Tuck
McClure, Rod J.
Farrow, Nathan C.
Gruen, Russell L.
Pollard, Cliff W.
Title Standardising trauma monitoring: the development of a minimum dataset for trauma registries in Australia and New Zealand
Journal name Injury: International Journal of the Care of the Injured   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-1383
1879-0267
Publication date 2013-06
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2012.11.022
Open Access Status
Volume 44
Issue 6
Start page 834
End page 841
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction: Trauma registries are central to the implementation of effective trauma systems. However, differences between trauma registry datasets make comparisons between trauma systems difficult. In 2005, the collaborative Australian and New Zealand National Trauma Registry Consortium began a process to develop a bi-national minimum dataset (BMDS) for use in Australasian trauma registries. This study aims to describe the steps taken in the development and preliminary evaluation of the BMDS.

Methods:
A working party comprising sixteen representatives from across Australasia identified and discussed the collectability and utility of potential BMDS fields. This included evaluating existing national and international trauma registry datasets, as well as reviewing all quality indicators and audit filters in use in Australasian trauma centres. After the working party activities concluded, this process was continued by a number of interested individuals, with broader feedback sought from the Australasian trauma community on a number of occasions. Once the BMDS had reached a suitable stage of development, an email survey was conducted across Australasian trauma centres to assess whether BMDS fields met an ideal minimum standard of field collectability. The BMDS was also compared with three prominent international datasets to assess the extent of dataset overlap. Following this, the BMDS was encapsulated in a data dictionary, which was introduced in late 2010.

Results:
The finalised BMDS contained 67 data fields. Forty-seven of these fields met a previously published criterion of 80% collectability across respondent trauma institutions; the majority of the remaining fields either could be collected without any change in resources, or could be calculated from other data fields in the BMDS. However, comparability with international registry datasets was poor. Only nine BMDS fields had corresponding, directly comparable fields in all the national and international-level registry datasets evaluated.

Conclusion: A draft BMDS has been developed for use in trauma registries across Australia and New Zealand. The email survey provided strong indications of the utility of the fields contained in the BMDS. The BMDS has been adopted as the dataset to be used by an ongoing Australian Trauma Quality Improvement Program.
Keyword Trauma registry
Trauma systems
Registry dataset
Outcome monitoring
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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