Ocean acidification and warming scenarios increase microbioerosion of coral skeletons

Reyes-Nivia, Catalina, Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo, Kline, David, Guldberg, Ove-Hoegh and Dove, Sophie (2013) Ocean acidification and warming scenarios increase microbioerosion of coral skeletons. Global Change Biology, 19 6: 1919-1929. doi:10.1111/gcb.12158


Author Reyes-Nivia, Catalina
Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo
Kline, David
Guldberg, Ove-Hoegh
Dove, Sophie
Title Ocean acidification and warming scenarios increase microbioerosion of coral skeletons
Journal name Global Change Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1354-1013
1365-2486
Publication date 2013-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12158
Volume 19
Issue 6
Start page 1919
End page 1929
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Biological mediation of carbonate dissolution represents a fundamental component of the destructive forces acting on coral reef ecosystems. Whereas ocean acidification can increase dissolution of carbonate substrates, the combined impact of ocean acidification and warming on the microbioerosion of coral skeletons remains unknown. Here, we exposed skeletons of the reef-building corals, Porites cylindrica and Isopora cuneata, to present-day (Control: 400 μatm - 24 °C) and future pCO2-temperature scenarios projected for the end of the century (Medium: +230 μatm - +2 °C; High: +610 μatm - +4 °C). Skeletons were also subjected to permanent darkness with initial sodium hypochlorite incubation, and natural light without sodium hypochlorite incubation to isolate the environmental effect of acidic seawater (i.e., Ωaragonite <1) from the biological effect of photosynthetic microborers. Our results indicated that skeletal dissolution is predominantly driven by photosynthetic microborers, as samples held in the dark did not decalcify. In contrast, dissolution of skeletons exposed to light increased under elevated pCO2-temperature scenarios, with P. cylindrica experiencing higher dissolution rates per month (89%) than I. cuneata (46%) in the high treatment relative to control. The effects of future pCO2-temperature scenarios on the structure of endolithic communities were only identified in P. cylindrica and were mostly associated with a higher abundance of the green algae Ostreobium spp. Enhanced skeletal dissolution was also associated with increased endolithic biomass and respiration under elevated pCO2-temperature scenarios. Our results suggest that future projections of ocean acidification and warming will lead to increased rates of microbioerosion. However, the magnitude of bioerosion responses may depend on the structural properties of coral skeletons, with a range of implications for reef carbonate losses under warmer and more acidic oceans.
Keyword Coral skeleton
Dissolution
Endolithic algae
Isopora
Microbioerosion
Ocean acidification and warming
Ostreobium
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 35 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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