Predicting the efficacy of simulator-based training using a perceptual judgment task versus questionnaire-based measures of presence

Wallis, Guy and Tichon, Jennifer (2013) Predicting the efficacy of simulator-based training using a perceptual judgment task versus questionnaire-based measures of presence. Presence-Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 22 1: 67-85. doi:10.1162/PRES_a_00135

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Author Wallis, Guy
Tichon, Jennifer
Title Predicting the efficacy of simulator-based training using a perceptual judgment task versus questionnaire-based measures of presence
Journal name Presence-Teleoperators and Virtual Environments   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1054-7460
1531-3263
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1162/PRES_a_00135
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 22
Issue 1
Start page 67
End page 85
Total pages 19
Place of publication Cambridge, MA, United States
Publisher MIT Press
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract The quality of a virtual environment, as characterized by factors such as presence and fidelity, is of interest to developers and users of simulators for many reasons, not least because both factors have been linked to improved outcomes in training as well as a reduced incidence of simulator sickness. Until recently, most approaches to measuring these factors have been based on subjective, postexposure questioning. This approach has, however, been criticized because of the shortcomings of self-report and the need to delay feedback or interrupt activity. To combat these problems, recent papers on the topic have proposed the use of behavioral measures to assess simulators and predict training outcomes. Following their lead, this paper makes use of a simple perceptual task in which users are asked to estimate their simulated speed within the environment. A longitudinal study of training outcomes using two of the simulators revealed systematic differences in task performance that matched differences measured using the perceptual task in a separate group of control subjects. A separate analysis of two standard presence questionnaires revealed that they were able to predict learning outcomes on a per individual basis, but that they were insensitive to the differences between the two simulators. The paper concludes by explaining how behavioral measures of the type proposed here can complement questionnaire-based studies, helping to motivate design aspects of new simulators, prompting changes to existing systems, and constraining training scenarios to maximize their efficacy.
Keyword Virtual environments
Self-motion
Speed
Sense
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Issue: Winter 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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