Phonation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI): prospective case examinations of the acute and sub-acute stages of recovery

MacBean, Naomi, Ward, Elizabeth, Murdoch, Bruce, Cahill, Louise and Geraghty, Timothy (2013) Phonation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI): prospective case examinations of the acute and sub-acute stages of recovery. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 15 3: 312-323. doi:10.3109/17549507.2013.777784


Author MacBean, Naomi
Ward, Elizabeth
Murdoch, Bruce
Cahill, Louise
Geraghty, Timothy
Title Phonation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI): prospective case examinations of the acute and sub-acute stages of recovery
Journal name International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1754-9507
1754-9515
Publication date 2013-06-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/17549507.2013.777784
Volume 15
Issue 3
Start page 312
End page 323
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract The aim of the investigation was to examine the changes in phonation and related quality-of-life in the acute and sub-acute stages of recovery post-cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). A prospective examination of phonation was conducted using perceptual and instrumental measures of respiratory and laryngeal functioning alongside a quality-of-life rating scale. Change was present across measures for both cases at each time point. Overall, a general pattern of recovery was seen, although some areas deteriorated between 6-12 months. Severity of impairments, extent of change, and impact on quality-of-life differed between the cases. Measures varied in sensitivity to change in function. Phonation can be impaired following both complete and incomplete CSCI, with type and severity of impairment/s undergoing change throughout the acute and sub-acute period post-injury. Spontaneous physiological recovery does not necessarily result in improved phonation and/ or quality-of-life. Potential exists for targeted speech-language therapy in this population, throughout recovery, to best capitalize on the physical changes that are occurring and to maximize functional application of skills to improve quality- of-life. Further research is warranted to examine this recovery period on a larger scale.
Keyword Respiration
Motor speech disorders
Voice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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