Non-invasive monitoring of sucrose mobilization from culm storage parenchyma by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

O'Neill, Brian P., Purnell, Matthew P., Kurniawan, Nyoman D., Cowin, Gary J., Galloway, Graham J., Nielsen, Lars K. and Brumbley, Stevens M. (2013) Non-invasive monitoring of sucrose mobilization from culm storage parenchyma by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, 77 3: 487-496. doi:10.1271/bbb.120682


Author O'Neill, Brian P.
Purnell, Matthew P.
Kurniawan, Nyoman D.
Cowin, Gary J.
Galloway, Graham J.
Nielsen, Lars K.
Brumbley, Stevens M.
Title Non-invasive monitoring of sucrose mobilization from culm storage parenchyma by magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Journal name Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0916-8451
1347-6947
Publication date 2013-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1271/bbb.120682
Volume 77
Issue 3
Start page 487
End page 496
Total pages 10
Place of publication Tokyo, Japan
Publisher Japan Society for Bioscience Biotechnology and Agrochemistry
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Because sucrose stored in mature stalks (in excess of 40% of stalk dry weight) can be wholly mobilized to supply carbon for the growth of heterotrophic tissues, we propose that sucrose mobilization requires a net sink-to-source transition that acts in toto within sett internode storage parenchyma. Based on our data we propose that mobilization of sucrose from culm storage parenchyma requires minimal investment of metabolic resources, and that the mechanism of sucrose mobilization is metabolically neutral. By magnetic resonance spectroscopy and phloem-specific tracer dyes, strong evidence was found that sucrose is mobilized from sett storage parenchyma via phloem to the growing shoot tissue. An analysis of the enzyme activities involved in sucrose metabolism and glycolysis suggested that sucrose synthase activity is downregulated due to the effects of sucrose mobilization. Overall, metabolism in storage parenchyma shifts from futile cycling to a more quiescent state during sucrose mobilization.
Keyword Carbon source-sink
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Sucrose derivatives
Sucrose mobilization
Sugarcane biofactory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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