The influence of follower mood on leader mood and task performance: an affective, follower-centric perspective of leadership

Tee, Eugene (Yu Jin), Ashkanasy, Neal M. and Paulsen, Neil (2013) The influence of follower mood on leader mood and task performance: an affective, follower-centric perspective of leadership. Leadership Quarterly, 24 4: 496-515. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2013.03.005

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Author Tee, Eugene (Yu Jin)
Ashkanasy, Neal M.
Paulsen, Neil
Title The influence of follower mood on leader mood and task performance: an affective, follower-centric perspective of leadership
Journal name Leadership Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1048-9843
1873-3409
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.leaqua.2013.03.005
Open Access Status
Volume 24
Issue 4
Start page 496
End page 515
Total pages 20
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Based on the notion that leadership involves affective exchange (Dasborough, Ashkanasy, Tee & Tse, 2009), we hypothesize that a leader's mood and task performance can be determined in part by follower mood displays. In two laboratory experiments, leaders supervised teams where the team members were confederates instructed to display positive or negative moods. Results were that followers' mood influenced leader mood and task performance. Moreover, leaders of positive mood followers were judged to have performed more effectively and expediently than leaders of followers who expressed negative mood states. We replicated these findings in Study 2 and found further that leaders high on neuroticism performed less effectively than their low neuroticism counterparts when interacting with negative-mood followers. Collectively, by demonstrating that follower moods influence leader affect and behaviors, our studies provide support for a core element of the Dasborough et al. (2009) reciprocal affect theory of leadership.
Keyword Emotions
Followers
Leadership
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online: 11 April 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 04 Jun 2013, 16:04:58 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School