Sifting, negotiating and remaking identities: The religious, cultural and ethnic identities and practices of diasporic Iranian and Turkish Muslim women in Brisbane, Australia

Stirling, Nicole Anne (2013). Sifting, negotiating and remaking identities: The religious, cultural and ethnic identities and practices of diasporic Iranian and Turkish Muslim women in Brisbane, Australia PhD Thesis, School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Stirling, Nicole Anne
Thesis Title Sifting, negotiating and remaking identities: The religious, cultural and ethnic identities and practices of diasporic Iranian and Turkish Muslim women in Brisbane, Australia
Formatted title
Sifting, Negotiating and Remaking Identities: The Religious, Cultural and Ethnic Identities and Practices of Diasporic Iranian and Turkish Muslim Women in Brisbane, Australia
School, Centre or Institute School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Sylvie Shaw
Patricia Short
Total pages 263
Total colour pages 2
Total black and white pages 261
Language eng
Subjects 22 Philosophy and Religious Studies
220405 Religion and Society
Formatted abstract
This thesis examines the journeys of sixty-two diasporic Muslim women from their Iranian and Turkish homelands to living in contemporary Australia. The women’s religious, cultural and ethnic identities and practices are the focus of the study and how these identities and observances are affected by the act of migration and then by making their home in a Western, secular, multicultural society such as Australia. Nine women were interviewed seven years after their first involvement in the study to examine changes to these identities over a longer timeframe. This thesis addresses important areas of focus such as changes to the women’s Muslim religious practices and identity and also for some, the rejection of this identity and the adoption of a different religious worldview. Cultural identity and observances are also an area of fluidity, with some women choosing to maintain many homeland cultural practices and others consciously rejecting such practices. Still other respondents mixed homeland practices and Australian cultural observances to form a new hybrid cultural identity. Ethnic identity was also another area of negotiation among some interviewees, with some women intentionally distancing themselves from their ethno diasporic grouping and others embracing and valuing their ethnic identity to a greater extent than in their homeland.

Many of the changes of religious, cultural and ethnic identities that had been voiced by the women are exemplified in the concepts of lived religion, where individuals live out their religious beliefs in a way that makes sense to them, and lived culture where cultural spaces are negotiated in relation to the meaning in one’s life. A new conceptual framework has been posited to describe the outworking of the identities of Iranian and Turkish interviewees, which is relational diasporic habitus and encapsulates how these women’s habitus develops, changes or remains constant in the diasporic space.

It can be seen that the women are actively sifting, negotiating and remaking their ethnic, cultural and religious identities and observances as they live their daily lives in Australia.
Keyword Iranian
Turkish
Muslim
Women
Diaspora
Migrants
Religious
Cultural
Ethnic
Identity

 
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Created: Mon, 03 Jun 2013, 22:37:13 EST by Ms Nicole Stirling on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service