Evaluating the validity of the JobFit system functional assessment method

Legge, Jennifer Barbara (2013). Evaluating the validity of the JobFit system functional assessment method PhD Thesis, School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
s33042316_phd_finalthesis.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 2.87MB 11
Author Legge, Jennifer Barbara
Thesis Title Evaluating the validity of the JobFit system functional assessment method
Formatted title
Evaluating the Validity of the JobFit System Functional Assessment Method
School, Centre or Institute School of Human Movement Studies
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Robin Burgess-Limerick
Geeske Peeters
Total pages 156
Total colour pages 9
Total black and white pages 147
Language eng
Subjects 111711 Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
110317 Physiotherapy
111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Abstract/Summary Abstract Background There is a strong focus in almost all developed countries, particularly over the last few decades, to achieve a zero rate of injury in the workplace for the benefit of the worker, the employer and the community. Despite workplace injury rates decreasing, costs are increasing and as such musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace continue to be a significant economic and social problem in industrial nations worldwide. This is also true for the Australian mining industry. Objectives To determine if a job-specific pre-employment functional assessment (PEFA) predicts musculoskeletal injury risk in healthy mine workers. Methods Participants in this prospective cohort study were recruited from an Australian coal mine between 2002 and 2009. At baseline, participants were screened with the JobFit System PEFA, and classified as PEFA 1 if they met job demands and PEFA>1 if not. Injury data was obtained from company records and coded for body part, mechanism and severity. The relationship between PEFA score and time to injury was analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression with adjustments for department and stratified for time. Area under the Receiver Operating Curve was calculated as a measure of the predictive ability of the tool Results Of the 600 participants (median age 37 years, range 17.0 to 62.6 years), 427 (71%) were assessed as meeting the demands of the job for which they were employed (PEFA 1), leaving 173 who were assessed as not completely meeting the demands of the job for which they were employed (PEFA >1). 196 musculoskeletal injuries were reported by 121 workers, including 35 back injuries from manual handling. Significant differences between PEFA groups were found in time to injury for all injury types over the long term (any injury: adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.4-3.9; manual handling injury: HR=3.3, CI=1.6-7.2; any back injury: HR=3.3, CI=1.6-6.6; back injuries from manual handling HR=5.8, CI=2.0-16.7), but not over the short term. An AUC value of 0.73 (CI=0.61-0.86) demonstrated acceptable predictive ability for back injuries from manual handling over the long term. Conclusions The JobFit System PEFA predicts musculoskeletal injury risk, particularly back injuries associated with manual handling, in healthy mine workers. These assessments have a role in an overall risk management approach to reducing musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace. More research is needed to determine the mitigating factors during, or the attenuating factors after, the initial honeymoon period when the workers’ injury risk was lowest. Additional research is also needed to identify which components of the JobFit System PEFA are more predictive of different injury types and body locations than others.
Formatted abstract
Background
There is a strong focus in almost all developed countries, particularly over the last few decades, to achieve a zero rate of injury in the workplace for the benefit of the worker, the employer and the community. Despite workplace injury rates decreasing, costs are increasing and as such musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace continue to be a significant economic and social problem in industrial nations worldwide. This is also true for the Australian mining industry.

Objectives
To determine if a job-specific pre-employment functional assessment (PEFA) predicts musculoskeletal injury risk in healthy mine workers.

Methods
Participants in this prospective cohort study were recruited from an Australian coal mine between 2002 and 2009. At baseline, participants were screened with the JobFit System PEFA, and classified as PEFA 1 if they met job demands and PEFA>1 if not. Injury data was obtained from company records and coded for body part, mechanism and severity. The relationship between PEFA score and time to injury was analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression with adjustments for department and stratified for time. Area under the Receiver Operating Curve was calculated as a measure of the predictive ability of the tool

Results
Of the 600 participants (median age 37 years, range 17.0 to 62.6 years), 427 (71%) were assessed as meeting the demands of the job for which they were employed (PEFA 1), leaving 173 who were assessed as not completely meeting the demands of the job for which they were employed (PEFA >1). 196 musculoskeletal injuries were reported by 121 workers, including 35 back injuries from manual handling. Significant differences between PEFA groups were found in time to injuryfor all injury types over the long term (any injury: adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.4-3.9; manual handling injury: HR=3.3, CI=1.6-7.2; any back injury: HR=3.3, CI=1.6-6.6; back injuries from manual handling HR=5.8, CI=2.0-16.7), but not over the short term.  An AUC value of 0.73 (CI=0.61-0.86) demonstrated acceptable predictive ability for back injuries from manual handling over the long term.

Conclusions
The JobFit System PEFA predicts musculoskeletal injury risk, particularly back injuries associated with manual handling, in healthy mine workers. These assessments have a role in an overall risk management approach to reducing musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace. More research is needed to determine the mitigating factors during, or the attenuating factors after, the initial honeymoon period when the workers’ injury risk was lowest. Additional research is alsoneeded to identify which components of the JobFit System PEFA are more predictive of different injury types and body locations than others.
Keyword Occupational Injuries
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Work Capacity Evaluation
Functional Capacity Evaluation
Physical Fitness
Back Injuries
Longitudinal Study
Employment Testing

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 26 May 2013, 22:19:44 EST by Jennifer Legge on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service