A review of the evidence regarding associations between attachment theory and experimentally induced pain

Meredith, Pamela Joy (2013) A review of the evidence regarding associations between attachment theory and experimentally induced pain. Current Pain and Headache Reports, 17 4: 326.1-326.9. doi:10.1007/s11916-013-0326-y

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Author Meredith, Pamela Joy
Title A review of the evidence regarding associations between attachment theory and experimentally induced pain
Journal name Current Pain and Headache Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1531-3433
1534-3081
Publication date 2013-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11916-013-0326-y
Volume 17
Issue 4
Start page 326.1
End page 326.9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Springer Healthcare
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that adult attachment and pain-related variables are predictably and consistently linked, and that understanding these links may guide pain intervention and prevention efforts. In general, insecure attachment has been portrayed as a risk factor, and secure attachment as a protective factor, for people with chronic pain conditions. In an effort to better understand the relationships among attachment and pain variables, these links have been investigated in pain-free samples using induced-pain techniques. The present paper reviews the available research linking adult attachment and laboratory-induced pain. While the diverse nature of the studies precludes definitive conclusions, together these papers offer support for associations between insecure attachment and a more negative pain experience. The evidence presented in this review highlights areas for further empirical attention, as well as providing some guidance for clinicians who may wish to employ preventive approaches and other interventions informed by attachment theory.
Keyword Chronic pain
Induced pain
Attachment theory
Cold pressor
Interventions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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