Spelling recognition after exposure to misspellings: implications for abstractionist vs. episodic theories of orthographic representations

Burt, Jennifer S., Salzgeber, Anna and Carroll, Michael F. (2013) Spelling recognition after exposure to misspellings: implications for abstractionist vs. episodic theories of orthographic representations. Acta Psychologica, 142 3: 383-393. doi:10.1016/j.actpsy.2013.01.015


Author Burt, Jennifer S.
Salzgeber, Anna
Carroll, Michael F.
Title Spelling recognition after exposure to misspellings: implications for abstractionist vs. episodic theories of orthographic representations
Journal name Acta Psychologica   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-6918
1873-6297
Publication date 2013-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.actpsy.2013.01.015
Volume 142
Issue 3
Start page 383
End page 393
Total pages 11
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract University students made spelling accuracy judgments about correctly and incorrectly spelled words that had been seen incorrectly spelled (Experiments 1 and 2). In contrast to results for spelling production, studying a misspelling produced a small benefit in classification of the correct word at test. When the studied misspelling was re-presented at test, there was a substantial cost in accuracy. Testing spelling recognition in an old context had a biassing effect, but there was little evidence of context re-instatement effects for studied words. In Experiment 3 students decided whether a correctly spelled word was spelled the same way at study and test. Participants' poor performance with words studied misspelled supports a priming explanation of the benefit for correct words. The differential effects for correct and incorrect test words cannot be explained in terms of updating abstract lexical representations, and the limitations on participants' item and context memory challenge episodic accounts of lexical representations.
Keyword Lexical representations
Abstractionist
Spelling recognition
Priming
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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