Pharmacoepidemiology and the Australian regional prevalence of multiple sclerosis

Hollingworth, Samantha, Walker, Kimitra, Page, Andrew and Eadie, Mervyn (2013) Pharmacoepidemiology and the Australian regional prevalence of multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 19 13: 1712-1716. doi:10.1177/1352458513482371

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Author Hollingworth, Samantha
Walker, Kimitra
Page, Andrew
Eadie, Mervyn
Title Pharmacoepidemiology and the Australian regional prevalence of multiple sclerosis
Journal name Multiple Sclerosis Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1352-4585
1477-0970
Publication date 2013-11
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1352458513482371
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 19
Issue 13
Start page 1712
End page 1716
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Over some 50 years, field surveys have shown that the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) increases with increasing distance from the equator in both the northern and the southern hemispheres. Such a latitudinal gradient has been found in field surveys of MS prevalence carried out at different times in various local regions of Australia.

Objective:
The objective of this paper is to use a pharmacoepidemiological approach to obtain whole of population estimates of the prevalence of MS in the various Australian states and territories from the use of MS disease-modifying drugs used to treat relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS).

Methods:
We analysed the dispensed use of subsidised RRMS drugs by jurisdiction.


Results: In the 2005–2008 period, the calculated mean treated RRMS prevalence in Australia ranged from 7.5 per 100,000 in the far north to 53.2 per 100,000 in the extreme south and was linearly related to increasing southerly latitude. Public domain Australian data suggested that multiplying this prevalence by a factor of 2.2 (to account for untreated RRMS and other types of MS) may provide a measure of the prevalence of all varieties of the disease.

Conclusion: These findings provide contemporary and more
Keyword Multiple sclerosis
Prevalence
Latitude
Disease distribution
Pharmacoepidemiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 30 Apr 2013, 16:04:20 EST by Myrtle Sahabandu on behalf of School of Pharmacy