Bacterial wilt of ginger in Queensland: reappraisal of a disease outbreak

Hayward, A. C. and Pegg, K. G. (2013) Bacterial wilt of ginger in Queensland: reappraisal of a disease outbreak. Australasian Plant Pathology, 42 3: 235-239. doi:10.1007/s13313-012-0174-y


Author Hayward, A. C.
Pegg, K. G.
Title Bacterial wilt of ginger in Queensland: reappraisal of a disease outbreak
Journal name Australasian Plant Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0815-3191
1448-6032
Publication date 2013-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s13313-012-0174-y
Volume 42
Issue 3
Start page 235
End page 239
Total pages 5
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In 1955 a severe wilt disease occurring on ginger in the Near North Coast district of Queensland was incorrectly attributed to infection by a Fusarium sp., and later shown to be caused by a strain of Ralstonia solanacearum, now reclassified as R. sequeirae. The disease was brought from China into Australia on latently infected rhizomes, and possibly also with associated soil. Several DNA-based diagnostic methods have shown that the pathogen causing bacterial wilt of ginger in parts of China is indistinguishable
from the pathogen uniquely associated with the disease in Queensland.
Keyword Latent infections
Ralstonia sequeirae
Phylotypes
Sequevars
BOX-PCR
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 7 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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