'Complexity' and the Australian continental narrative: themes in the archaeology of Holocene Australia

Ulm, Sean (2013) 'Complexity' and the Australian continental narrative: themes in the archaeology of Holocene Australia. Quaternary International, 285 182-192. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2012.03.046


Author Ulm, Sean
Title 'Complexity' and the Australian continental narrative: themes in the archaeology of Holocene Australia
Journal name Quaternary International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1040-6182
1873-4553
Publication date 2013-02-08
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.quaint.2012.03.046
Volume 285
Start page 182
End page 192
Total pages 11
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Accounts of long-term cultural change in Australia have emphasised the late Holocene as the period when ‘complexity’ emerged amongst foragers in Australia, associated with increased economic productivity, reduced mobility, population growth, intensified social relations and cosmological elaboration. These reconfigurations have often been interpreted as the result of continent-wide trajectories which began in the mid-Holocene, often termed ‘intensification’. These approaches have been found wanting as they homogenise diverse records of human adaptation into a single account which inexorably leads to the ethnographic present. The archaeological record tells a rather different story with fluctuating occupational intensity and even regional abandonments featuring in well-documented archaeological records. Instead, variability documented in the ethnographic and archaeological records can be understood as a product of local adaptations reflecting the operation of historically situated systems of social organisation in diverse environmental settings.
Keyword Human-environment interactions
Stratigraphic integrity
Southeastern Australia
Queensland
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published online 30 March 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit Publications
Non HERDC
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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