Health education and health screening in a sample of older men: a descriptive survey

Dallas, Janette and Neville, Stephen (2012) Health education and health screening in a sample of older men: a descriptive survey. Nursing Praxis in New Zealand, 28 1: 6-16.

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Author Dallas, Janette
Neville, Stephen
Title Health education and health screening in a sample of older men: a descriptive survey
Journal name Nursing Praxis in New Zealand   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0112-7438
Publication date 2012-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 28
Issue 1
Start page 6
End page 16
Total pages 11
Place of publication Palmerston North, New Zealand
Publisher Nursing Praxis in N.Z.
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Internationally, the number of people aged over 65 is increasing, in both absolute and relative terms. There is little doubt
that a healthy lifestyle, and participation in health education and health screening activities, contribute to longevity. Gender
is also considered to be a strong indicator of health and longevity, as women tend to live longer and healthier lives than
men. There is abundant literature on older people’s health but a significant lack of research specifically on older men.

This study involved 59 community dwelling men aged 65 years or over, living in Wanganui (a city located in the North
Island of New Zealand). The aim of the study was to describe the health education and health screenings older men living
in Wanganui attended, and to ascertain the barriers and/or benefits of healthy lifestyle choices. Data were collected via
a self-administered questionnaire.

Findings from the study were that the majority of men reported good or excellent health. On average, men had participated
in 1.6 health education programmes and attended 3.1 health screenings during the previous 12 months. Most considered
there were no barriers to following a healthy lifestyle and on average identified four benefits to living a healthy lifestyle.
The most common benefit reported was increased opportunities for socialisation.

While it is acknowledged that more substantive research is required with a larger heterogeneous group of older men, this study
provides useful baseline data on participation in health education and health screening programmes. The study also highlights
that nurses need to facilitate and provide health education and health promoting activities that support healthy lifestyle
choices in older men. The findings also suggest that the Older Men’s Health Program and Screening Inventory questionnaire
would need significant adaptation before it could be used with a representative sample of older New Zealand men.
Keyword Older men
Health education
Health screening
Gerontological nursing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Apr 2013, 13:16:39 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work