Increasing anthocyanin content in queen garnet plum and correlations with in-field measures

Fanning, K., Edwards, D., Netzel, M., Stanley, R., Netzel. G., Russell, D. and Topp, B. (2013). Increasing anthocyanin content in queen garnet plum and correlations with in-field measures. In: Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Plum and Prune Genetics, Breeding and Pomology. 10th International Symposium on Plum and Prune Genetics, Breeding and Pomology, Davis, CA, United States, (97-104). 20-26 May 2012.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Fanning, K.
Edwards, D.
Netzel, M.
Stanley, R.
Netzel. G.
Russell, D.
Topp, B.
Title of paper Increasing anthocyanin content in queen garnet plum and correlations with in-field measures
Conference name 10th International Symposium on Plum and Prune Genetics, Breeding and Pomology
Conference location Davis, CA, United States
Conference dates 20-26 May 2012
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Plum and Prune Genetics, Breeding and Pomology   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9789066053397
ISSN 0567-7572
Volume 985
Start page 97
End page 104
Total pages 8
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
While plums are traditionally bred for fresh fruit traits such as size, sweetness, yield and disease resistance the Queensland Government breeding program for Japanese plum (Prunus salicina Lindl.) also selected for anthocyanin content to develop a new plum selection named ‘Queen Garnet’. When ripe or overripe, it has a near black skin and deep red flesh colour, which when combined, result in exceptionally high anthocyanin content, reaching up to 277 mg/100 g fruit. The skin fraction contributes 36-66% of the total anthocyanin content of fruit. The plum is now being commercially grown to be processed into a range of unctional products from food colourants to premium health products. These are sold on the basis of anthocyanin and antioxidant content. Protocols for increasing anthocyanin content have therefore been researched to maximise the total anthocyanin yield rather than fresh fruit weight and taste. The principal approach is through selective harvest of overripe plums high in colour, although post-harvest storage at 21°C results in further anthocyanin synthesis. Modified processing is also required to ensure recovery of anthocyanins from the skin fraction. The plum products have entered testing for assessing health properties beginning with an initial proof of in vivo bioavailability of the anthocyanins.
Keyword Prunus salicina
Phytochemicals
Antioxidants
Functional food
Health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sun, 14 Apr 2013, 17:07:22 EST by Michael Netzel on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation