An expanded self-medication hypothesis based on cognitive behavioural determinants for heroin abusers in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study

Lee, Kun-Hua Sam, Bowen, Sarah, Oei, Tian P. S. and Yen, Cheng-Fang (2012) An expanded self-medication hypothesis based on cognitive behavioural determinants for heroin abusers in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study. American Journal on Addictions, 21 Supplement s1: S43-S48. doi:10.1111/j.1521-0391.2012.00301.x

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Author Lee, Kun-Hua Sam
Bowen, Sarah
Oei, Tian P. S.
Yen, Cheng-Fang
Title An expanded self-medication hypothesis based on cognitive behavioural determinants for heroin abusers in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study
Journal name American Journal on Addictions   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1055-0496
1521-0391
Publication date 2012-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1521-0391.2012.00301.x
Volume 21
Issue Supplement s1
Start page S43
End page S48
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: This study proposed and examined an expanded self-medication hypothesis (eSMH) model based on cognitive behavioral determinants, including the direct effects of negative emotional states, positive outcome expectancies and refusal self-efficacy on heroin use, and the mediating roles of positive outcome expectancies and refusal self-efficacy between negative emotional states and heroin use.

Methods:
A total of 360 male heroin abusers were recruited from a drug abuse treatment center in Taiwan. Participants were asked to complete a set of questionnaires on frequency of heroin use, anxious/depressive mood, positive outcome expectancies, and refusal self-efficacy. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the eSMH model.

Results: Results showed that the eSMH model displayed proper goodness-of-fit. Positive outcome expectancies and negative emotional status were significant predictors of heroin use, whereas refusal self-efficacy was not a significant predictor. Additionally, positive self-efficacy was a mediator between negative emotional status and heroin use.

Conclusion: Results support a reduced eSMH model and suggest a significant role of positive self-efficacy in the relationship between negative affective states and heroin use. This relationship should be examined in the longitudinal study, and should be given clinical consideration in treatment of individuals struggling with heroin abuse and negative affective states.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 14 Apr 2013, 12:57:31 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology