Neurogenic and psychogenic acute postconcussion symptoms can be identified after mild traumatic brain injury

Mounce, Luke T., Williams, W. Huw, Jones, Janelle M., Harris, Adrian, Haslam, S. Alexander and Jetten, Jolanda (2012) Neurogenic and psychogenic acute postconcussion symptoms can be identified after mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 28 5: 397-405. doi:10.1097/HTR.0b013e318252dd75


Author Mounce, Luke T.
Williams, W. Huw
Jones, Janelle M.
Harris, Adrian
Haslam, S. Alexander
Jetten, Jolanda
Title Neurogenic and psychogenic acute postconcussion symptoms can be identified after mild traumatic brain injury
Journal name Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0885-9701
1550-509X
Publication date 2012-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/HTR.0b013e318252dd75
Volume 28
Issue 5
Start page 397
End page 405
Total pages 9
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVES: As provenance of postconcussion symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is controversial, with similar rates found in other populations, we aimed to identify postconcussion symptoms specific to mTBI compared with controls. We also compared differences between complicated and uncomplicated mTBIs. SETTING: Hospital emergency department.
PARTICIPANTS: Adult individuals (34 individuals with complicated mTBI, 76 individuals with uncomplicated mTBI, and 47 orthopedic controls) who sought care in the emergency department and were consecutively recruited by post at 2 weeks postinjury.
MAIN MEASURES: Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire. Preinjury factors were used as covariates.
RESULTS: Compared with orthopedic controls, complicated mTBI group reported greater severity of headaches, dizziness, and nausea, as well as concentration difficulties, suggesting that these are neurogenic. Severity of other symptoms measured on the Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire was not significantly different between these groups, suggesting that these are psychogenic. Differences were evident between the 2 mTBI samples on the items of dizziness, nausea, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and concentration difficulties.
CONCLUSIONS: Neurogenic and psychogenic postconcussion symptoms were identified at the acute-phase postinjury. Findings suggest that treating persons with mTBI as a homogenous sample is not prudent. This should inform prognostic models and follow-up support offered after leaving the emergency department.
Keyword Concussion
Emergency Medicine
Mild traumatic brain injury
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 14 Apr 2013, 21:49:30 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology