The role of psychological symptoms and social group memberships in the development of post-traumatic stress after traumatic injury

Jones, Janelle M., Williams, W. Huw, Jetten, Jolanda, Haslam, S. Alexander, Harris, Adrian and Gleibs, Ilka H. (2012) The role of psychological symptoms and social group memberships in the development of post-traumatic stress after traumatic injury. British Journal of Health Psychology, 17 4: 798-811. doi:10.1111/j.2044-8287.2012.02074.x


Author Jones, Janelle M.
Williams, W. Huw
Jetten, Jolanda
Haslam, S. Alexander
Harris, Adrian
Gleibs, Ilka H.
Title The role of psychological symptoms and social group memberships in the development of post-traumatic stress after traumatic injury
Journal name British Journal of Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1359-107X
2044-8287
Publication date 2012-11
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.2044-8287.2012.02074.x
Open Access Status
Volume 17
Issue 4
Start page 798
End page 811
Total pages 14
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley and Sons
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives. The costs associated with traumatic injury are often exacerbated by the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms. However, it is unclear what decreases the development of post-traumatic symptoms over time. The aim of the present research was to examine the role of psychological symptoms and social group memberships in reducing the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms after orthopaedic injuries (OIs) and acquired brain injuries (ABIs).

Design and Methods. A longitudinal prospective study assessed self-reported general health symptoms, social group memberships, and post-traumatic stress symptoms among participants with mild or moderate ABI (n= 62) or upper limb OI (n= 31) at 2 weeks (T1) and 3 months (T2) after injury.

Results. Hierarchical regressions revealed that having fewer T1 general health symptoms predicted lower levels of T2 post-traumatic stress symptoms after OI but forming more new group memberships at T1 predicted lower levels of T2 post-traumatic stress symptoms after ABI.

Conclusion. A focus on acquiring group memberships may be particularly important in reducing the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms after injuries, such as ABI, which result in long-term life changes.
Keyword Form Health Survey
Brain Injury
Residential Care
Disorder
Metaanalysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 14 Apr 2013, 11:43:04 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology