Vets versus pets: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Australian animals and their doctors

Trott, Darren, Jordan, David, Barton, Mary, Abraham, Sam and Groves, Mitchell (2013) Vets versus pets: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Australian animals and their doctors. Microbiology Australia, 34 1: 25-27.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Trott, Darren
Jordan, David
Barton, Mary
Abraham, Sam
Groves, Mitchell
Title Vets versus pets: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Australian animals and their doctors
Formatted title
Vets versus pets: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Australian animals and their doctors
Journal name Microbiology Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1324-4272
Publication date 2013-03
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 34
Issue 1
Start page 25
End page 27
Total pages 3
Place of publication South Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australian Society for Microbiology
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 Humans and animals intimately sharing the same environment will inevitably be exposed to each other’s microbiota. When one of those organisms is a drug-resistant pathogen then logistics of disease prevention are raised to a new level of complexity. For this reason the study of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in man and animals is now a priority. Recent research has demonstrated the ease with which MRSA crosses species barriers and the grave potential for MRSA to cause serious disease in animals and man has been well established. However, a key feature of MRSA (as compared zoonotic, resistant Salmonella spp.) is that companion and performance animals appear to have pivotal roles in the ecology of spread of certain genotypes found in humans. In this article we summarise the major developments in animal-human MRSA with an emphasis on the most recent Australian data incriminating involvement of companion and performance animals in the ecology of spread. 
Keyword Staphylococcus
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Apr 2013, 16:52:02 EST by Mr Mitchell Groves on behalf of School of Veterinary Science