It's Not What She Says, It's How She Says It: The Influence of Language Complexity and Cognitive Load on the Persuasiveness of Expert Testimony

McKimmie, Blake M., Newton, Sara A., Schuller, Regina A. and Terry, Deborah J. (2013) It's Not What She Says, It's How She Says It: The Influence of Language Complexity and Cognitive Load on the Persuasiveness of Expert Testimony. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 20 4: 578-589. doi:10.1080/13218719.2012.727068


Author McKimmie, Blake M.
Newton, Sara A.
Schuller, Regina A.
Terry, Deborah J.
Title It's Not What She Says, It's How She Says It: The Influence of Language Complexity and Cognitive Load on the Persuasiveness of Expert Testimony
Journal name Psychiatry, Psychology and Law   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1321-8719
1934-1687
Publication date 2013-08
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13218719.2012.727068
Open Access Status
Volume 20
Issue 4
Start page 578
End page 589
Total pages 12
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Mock jurors rely on a variety of heuristics and stereotypes about expert witnesses when evaluating their testimony. Research indicates that these extra-legal cues have their greatest impact when expert testimony is complex and so processed in a less effortful manner. Previous work suggests that language complexity may also be related to stereotypes about expert gender. This research tested the hypothesis that complex language is seen as stereotypically associated with male experts, whereas simple language is associated with female experts, and that such expectations about the gender orientation of the expert's language influence mock jurors' judgments such that they would be more persuaded when an expert used language that matched his/her gender. Results provided some support for predictions, primarily when the expert was female.
Keyword Expert testimony
Gender
Jury decision-making
Language complexity
Stereotypes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes iFirst article. Version of record first published: 24 Sep 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Apr 2013, 16:15:36 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology