Investigating the neural basis of stuttering using transcranial magnetic stimulation: Preliminary case discussion

Barwood, Caroline H.S, Murdoch, Bruce E., Goozee, Justine V. and Riek, Stephen (2013) Investigating the neural basis of stuttering using transcranial magnetic stimulation: Preliminary case discussion. Speech, Language and Hearing, 16 1: 18-27.

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Author Barwood, Caroline H.S
Murdoch, Bruce E.
Goozee, Justine V.
Riek, Stephen
Title Investigating the neural basis of stuttering using transcranial magnetic stimulation: Preliminary case discussion
Journal name Speech, Language and Hearing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2050-571X
2050-5728
Publication date 2013-03-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 16
Issue 1
Start page 18
End page 27
Total pages 10
Place of publication Leeds, W Yorks, United Kingdom
Publisher Maney Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Neuroimaging studies have found particular areas of the brain to be over- or under-active in persons who stutter (PWS) suggestive of atypical lateralization of speech and language processing. This study used single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate differences in left and right tongue motor cortex excitability in three adult male PWS compared with five adult control speakers (four males). TMS pulses were applied to the left and right side of the head over the tongue motor cortices. Measures of excitability included: active motor threshold (AMT, i.e. the amount of stimulation required to elicit a consistent motor evoked potential (MEP) in the tongue), and the y-intercept and slope of linear regressions derived from plots of electromyography contraction levels versus MEP amplitudes (input‚Äźoutput facilitation curves). The results are presented as a series of case discussions. The control group exhibited increased excitability for the left tongue motor cortex compared with the right based on y-intercept measures, although no inter-hemispheric excitability differences were found based on AMT or slope measures. A reversed pattern of excitability was found for the PWS who exhibited decreased and increased left and right tongue motor cortex excitability, respectively, based on the y-intercept and AMT measures compared with the control group. The results provide support for the suggestion of inter-hemispheric excitability disturbances in PWS and warrants further investigation using TMS techniques.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Apr 2013, 14:29:59 EST by Ms Caroline Barwood on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences