What motivates which volunteers? Psychographic heterogeneity among volunteers in Australia

Dolnicar, Sara and Randle, Melanie (2007) What motivates which volunteers? Psychographic heterogeneity among volunteers in Australia. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organisations, 18 2: 135-155. doi:10.1007/s11266-007-9037-5


Author Dolnicar, Sara
Randle, Melanie
Title What motivates which volunteers? Psychographic heterogeneity among volunteers in Australia
Journal name Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organisations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0957-8765
Publication date 2007-06
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11266-007-9037-5
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 135
End page 155
Total pages 21
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Six psychographic segments of volunteers in Australia are constructed on the basis of their volunteering motivations. The resulting segments include "classic volunteers," whose motivations are threefold: doing something worthwhile; personal satisfaction; and helping others. "Dedicated volunteers" perceive each one of the motives for volunteering as relevant, while "personally involved volunteers" donate time because of someone they know in the organization, most likely their child. "Volunteers for personal satisfaction" and "altruists" primarily wish to help others, and finally, "niche volunteers" typically have fewer and more specific drivers motivating them to donate time, for example, to gain work experience. The segments are externally validated and demonstrate significantly different socio-demographic profiles. Consequently, it seems that motivation-based data-driven market segmentation represents a useful way of gaining insight into heterogeneity amongst volunteers. Such insight can be used by volunteering organizations to more effectively target segments with customized messages.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 11 Apr 2013, 16:10:23 EST by Dr Kayleen Campbell on behalf of School of Tourism