The topography of multiple drug use among adolescent Australians: findings from the National Drug Strategy Household Survey

White, Angela, Chan, Gary C. K., Quek, Lake-Hui, Connor, Jason P., Saunders, John B., Baker, Peter, Brackenridge, Charlotte and Kelly, Adrian B. (2013) The topography of multiple drug use among adolescent Australians: findings from the National Drug Strategy Household Survey. Addictive Behaviors, 38 4: 2068-2073. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.01.001

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Author White, Angela
Chan, Gary C. K.
Quek, Lake-Hui
Connor, Jason P.
Saunders, John B.
Baker, Peter
Brackenridge, Charlotte
Kelly, Adrian B.
Title The topography of multiple drug use among adolescent Australians: findings from the National Drug Strategy Household Survey
Journal name Addictive Behaviors   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-4603
1873-6327
Publication date 2013-04
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.01.001
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 38
Issue 4
Start page 2068
End page 2073
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction and aims: Despite evidence that many Australian adolescents have considerable experience with various drug types, little is known about the extent to which adolescents use multiple substances. The aim of this study was to examine the degree of clustering of drug types within individuals, and the extent to which demographic and psychosocial predictors are related to cluster membership.

Design and method: A sample of 1402 adolescents aged 12–17 years were extracted from the Australian 2007 National Drug Strategy Household Survey. Extracted data included lifetime use of 10 substances, gender, psychological distress, physical health, perceived peer substance use, socioeconomic disadvantage, and regionality. Latent
class analysis was used to determine clusters, and multinomial logistic regression employed to examine predictors of cluster membership.

Result: There were 3 latent classes. The great majority (79.6%) of adolescents used alcohol only, 18.3% were limited range multidrug users (encompassing alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana), and 2% were extended range multidrug users. Perceived peer drug use and psychological distress predicted limited and extended multiple drug use. Psychological distress was a more significant predictor of extendedmultidrug use compared to limited multidrug use.

Discussion and conclusion: In the Australian school-based prevention setting, a very strong focus on alcohol use and the linkages between alcohol, tobacco and marijuana are warranted. Psychological distress may be an important target for screening and early intervention for adolescents who use multiple drugs.
Keyword Adolescent
Multidrug use
Latent class analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 11 Apr 2013, 13:15:19 EST by Ms Dayna Smith on behalf of Centre for Youth Substance Abuse