Politeness and perambulation: the etiquette of the street in 19th century advice manuals

Sully, Nicole (2012). Politeness and perambulation: the etiquette of the street in 19th century advice manuals. In: Stuart King, Anuradha Chatterjee and Stephen Loo, Fabulation: Myth, Nature, Heritage: The 29th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Launceston, Tas., Australia, (1065-1079). 5 - 8 July 2012.

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Author Sully, Nicole
Title of paper Politeness and perambulation: the etiquette of the street in 19th century advice manuals
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Conference location Launceston, Tas., Australia
Conference dates 5 - 8 July 2012
Proceedings title Fabulation: Myth, Nature, Heritage: The 29th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Place of Publication Launceston, Tas., Australia
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians of Australia and New Zealand
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781862956582
Editor Stuart King
Anuradha Chatterjee
Stephen Loo
Start page 1065
End page 1079
Total pages 15
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The nineteenth century witnessed a vast increase in the publication of advice manuals in many fields of interest, including the production of treatises on etiquette, manners and behaviour that were aimed at both male and female readers. Treatises such as The Laws of Etiquette (1836), A Manual of Politeness (1837) and Martine's Hand-book of Etiquette and Guide to True Politeness (1866) advised their readers on the proper codes and practices of behaviour at the dining table and in the ballroom, as well as more general advice on small-talk, avoiding awkwardness and characteristics of goodbreeding. While the emphasis of such publications was, generally, in advising individuals on the proper customs and behaviours within the domestic sphere, they also offered advice on correct behaviour when travelling outside of the home: both in the city or town of one's residence, and when travelling further afield. In particular, such publications commonly featured sections on 'street etiquette' that outlined the proper conventions for walking, meeting, greeting and deportment on the street. The overwhelming emphasis of such advice was the proper behaviour of and towards ladies in the public realm of the street. This paper will examine the codes of behaviour for the street and contextualise these advice manuals amongst architectural and social practices of the city.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 10 Apr 2013, 15:26:43 EST by Nicole Sully on behalf of School of Architecture