Evaluation of the efficacy and economics of irrigation management, plant resistance and Brassicaspot™ models for management of white blister on Brassica crops

Minchinton, E. J., Auer, D. P. F., Thomson, F. M., Trapnell, L. N., Petkowski, J. E., Galea, V., Faggian, R., Kita, N., Murdoch, C. and Kennedy, R. (2013) Evaluation of the efficacy and economics of irrigation management, plant resistance and Brassicaspot™ models for management of white blister on Brassica crops. Australasian Plant Pathology, 42 2: 169-178. doi:10.1007/s13313-012-0181-z


Author Minchinton, E. J.
Auer, D. P. F.
Thomson, F. M.
Trapnell, L. N.
Petkowski, J. E.
Galea, V.
Faggian, R.
Kita, N.
Murdoch, C.
Kennedy, R.
Title Evaluation of the efficacy and economics of irrigation management, plant resistance and Brassicaspot™ models for management of white blister on Brassica crops
Formatted title
Evaluation of the efficacy and economics of irrigation management, plant resistance and Brassicaspot™ models for management of white blister on Brassica crops
Journal name Australasian Plant Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0815-3191
1448-6032
Publication date 2013-03
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s13313-012-0181-z
Volume 42
Issue 2
Start page 169
End page 178
Total pages 10
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Options for the integrated management of white blister (caused by Albugo candida) of Brassica crops include the use of well timed overhead irrigation, resistant cultivars,  programs of weekly fungicide sprays or strategic fungicide applications based on the disease risk prediction model, Brassicaspot™. Initial systematic surveys of radish producers near Melbourne, Victoria, indicated that crops irrigated overhead in the morning (0800–1200 h) had a lower incidence of white blister than those irrigated overhead in the evening (2000–2400 h). A field trial was conducted from July to  November 2008 on a broccoli crop located west of Melbourne to determine the efficacy and economics of different practices used for white blister control, modifying irrigation timing, growing a resistant cultivar and timing spray applications based on Brassicaspot™. Growing the resistant cultivar, ‘Tyson’, instead of the susceptible cultivar, ‘Ironman’, reduced disease incidence on broccoli heads by 99 %. Overhead irrigation at 0400 h instead of 2000 h reduced disease incidence by 58 %. A weekly spray program or a spray regime based on either of two versions of the  Brassicaspot™ model provided similar disease control and reduced disease incidence by 72 to 83 %. However, use of the Brassicaspot™ models greatly reduced the number of sprays required for control from 14 to one or two. An economic analysis showed that growing the more resistant cultivar increased farm profit per ha by 12 %, choosing morning irrigation by 3 % and using the disease risk predictive models compared with weekly sprays by 15 %. The disease risk predictive models were 4 % more profitable than the unsprayed control.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 7/12/2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Created: Thu, 04 Apr 2013, 01:28:27 EST by Dr Victor Galea on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences