Semi-automated, non-weighing, pot-in-bucket (PIB), water management in pot plant culture

Hunter, Mal, Mitchell, Jaquie and Dieters, Mark (2012). Semi-automated, non-weighing, pot-in-bucket (PIB), water management in pot plant culture. In: I. Yunusa, Capturing Opportunities and Overcoming Obstacles in Australian Agronomy: Proceedings of 16th Agronomy Conference 2012. 16th Australian Agronomy Conference, Armidale, NSW, Australia, (). 14-18 October 2012.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Hunter, Mal
Mitchell, Jaquie
Dieters, Mark
Title of paper Semi-automated, non-weighing, pot-in-bucket (PIB), water management in pot plant culture
Conference name 16th Australian Agronomy Conference
Conference location Armidale, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 14-18 October 2012
Proceedings title Capturing Opportunities and Overcoming Obstacles in Australian Agronomy: Proceedings of 16th Agronomy Conference 2012
Place of Publication Armidale, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian Society of Agronomy
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor I. Yunusa
Total pages 6
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Constant water tables (CWT) in pots have been used in the determination of plant water-use. While the CWT systems eliminate the labour required in watering-to-weight systems, they may be overly wet with the constant water table within the pot itself. A valve in our Pot-In-Bucket (PIB) system maintains the water table at a nominated constant height above, within or below the contents of each test pot. In the latter configuration, the CWT supplies water to an upper ANOVApot® through a capillary tape draped over an upturned pot within the bucket which encloses the valve and supports the upper ANOVApot®. This valve is connected to a remotely located 5L container of water via a medical infusion set. Water-use by a plant/s growing in the ANOVApot® is monitored as changes in water level in the calibrated 5L container. Real time (2-20 minute delay) variation in rate of water-use from plants can be observed (as drips (0.066mL) per second) in the sight glass of the infusion set. Having groups of containers located remotely from the pots they supply, greatly facilitates the ease and speed of the refilling operation and drip rate measurements. Changes in pot weight provide a measure of whole plant biomass and when coupled with water-use enables the non-destructive measurement of water-use efficiency during the crop’s lifecycle. This system has worked well in water-use experiments in wheat and rice.
Keyword Automatic
Transpiration
Fresh weights
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Created: Wed, 03 Apr 2013, 14:05:52 EST by Mrs Jaquie Mitchell on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences