Relationship between blood culture collection method and proportion of contaminated cultures in neonates

McLaughlin, Linda M., Inglis, Garry D. T., Hoellering, Adam B. and Davies, Mark W. (2013) Relationship between blood culture collection method and proportion of contaminated cultures in neonates. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 49 2: 105-108. doi:10.1111/jpc.12088


Author McLaughlin, Linda M.
Inglis, Garry D. T.
Hoellering, Adam B.
Davies, Mark W.
Title Relationship between blood culture collection method and proportion of contaminated cultures in neonates
Journal name Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-4810
1440-1754
Publication date 2013-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12088
Volume 49
Issue 2
Start page 105
End page 108
Total pages 4
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim This study aims to document methods of blood culture collection used in our neonatal unit and to determine whether or not the proportion of contaminated cultures varied according to method of collection. Two specific comparisons of interest were the proportion of contaminated cultures in samples collected via (i) preferred versus non-preferred methods, and (ii) peripheral cannulae at the time of insertion versus separate arterial or venous puncture.

Methods Data were collected on every blood culture taken in the Grantley Stable Neonatal Unit of the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital over a 12-month period. The method used to collect blood for culture was recorded, and the proportion of contaminated cultures taken by each method was calculated.

Results Blood was collected via peripheral cannulae at the time of insertion in 63.1% of cultures, umbilical catheters at the time of insertion in 18.1%, peripheral arterial or venous puncture in 7.7%, and indwelling lines in 2.1%, and the method was unknown in 9.0%. The proportion of contaminated blood cultures was 11.5% with collection via peripheral vascular puncture, 11.1% via indwelling lines, 2.1% via peripheral cannulae at the time of insertion and 1.1% via umbilical catheters at the time of insertion. There was no significant difference in the proportion of contaminated cultures taken via preferred and non-preferred methods. The proportion of contaminated cultures taken via peripheral cannulae at the time of insertion was significantly less than when samples were taken via a separate arterial or venous puncture.

Conclusions In our unit, blood cultures are frequently collected via peripheral cannulae at the time of insertion. Blood cultures taken in this manner are less likely to be contaminated than cultures collected via separate vascular puncture.
Keyword Bacteraemia
Newborn infants
Sepsis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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