The relevance of shared experiences: a multi-level study of collective efficacy as a moderator of job control in the stressor-strain relationship

Tucker, Michelle K., Jimmieson, Nerina L. and Oei, Tian P. (2013) The relevance of shared experiences: a multi-level study of collective efficacy as a moderator of job control in the stressor-strain relationship. Work and Stress, 27 1: 1-21. doi:10.1080/02678373.2013.772356

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Author Tucker, Michelle K.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Oei, Tian P.
Title The relevance of shared experiences: a multi-level study of collective efficacy as a moderator of job control in the stressor-strain relationship
Journal name Work and Stress   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0267-8373
1464-5335
Publication date 2013-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02678373.2013.772356
Open Access Status
Volume 27
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Karasek's Job Demand-Control model proposes that control mitigates the positive effects of work stressors on employee strain. Evidence to date remains mixed and, although a number of individual-level moderators have been examined, the role of broader, contextual, group factors has been largely overlooked. In this study, the extent to which control buffered or exacerbated the effects of demands on strain at the individual level was hypothesized to be influenced by perceptions of collective efficacy at the group level. Data from 544 employees in Australian organizations, nested within 23 workgroups, revealed significant three-way cross-level interactions among demands, control and collective efficacy on anxiety and job satisfaction. When the group perceived high levels of collective efficacy, high control buffered the negative consequences of high demands on anxiety and satisfaction. Conversely, when the group perceived low levels of collective efficacy, high control exacerbated the negative consequences of high demands on anxiety, but not satisfaction. In addition, a stress-exacerbating effect for high demands on anxiety and satisfaction was found when there was a mismatch between collective efficacy and control (i.e. combined high collective efficacy and low control). These results provide support for the notion that the stressor-strain relationship is moderated by both individual- and group-level factors.
Keyword Job demand
Job control
Collective efficacy
Employee strain
Work-related stress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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