Mining and urbanisation in Australia: back to the future

Aitchison, Mathew (2012). Mining and urbanisation in Australia: back to the future. In: Stuart King, Anuradha Chatterjee and Stephen Loo, Fabulation: Myth, Nature, Heritage: The 29th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Launceston, Tas., Australia, (1-14). 5 - 8 July 2012.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Aitchison, Mathew
Title of paper Mining and urbanisation in Australia: back to the future
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Conference location Launceston, Tas., Australia
Conference dates 5 - 8 July 2012
Proceedings title Fabulation: Myth, Nature, Heritage: The 29th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Place of Publication Launceston, Tas., Australia
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians of Australia and New Zealand
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781862956582
Editor Stuart King
Anuradha Chatterjee
Stephen Loo
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Mining occupies a special place in the history of Australia's urbanisation. Australia's highly urban and centralised population distribution has meant that, with few exceptions, the state coastal capitals have remained the most populous and consistent growth centres for over a century. In this history,mining, and to a lesser degree agriculture, are listed as offsetting forces to the pattern of urban hegemony, as providers of the initial impetus for the development of towns and cities in many rural and regional areas. Recently, the mining and resources sector have attracted closer scrutiny, in particular for the problems they raise within these same remote and regional areas, in particular the associated Fly-In-Fly-Out work practices. With reference to impressions of mining from popular films, this paper discusses the history of the building and planning associated with mining, and the broader issues of the relationship between industry and urbanisation in Australia. How have industries such as mining affected Australia's pattern of urbanisation? Are they an economic lifeline to the otherwise neglected remote and regional areas? Does mining offset the otherwise clear pattern of urbanisation? Or, has it only accelerated the processes of economic contraction that were already well established in rural and remote areas of Australia? In discussing these issues, this paper attempts to look beyond the immediate achievements in architecture and planning, towards the greater impact of the mining industry on the wider trend of urbanisation in Australia.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 28 Mar 2013, 11:27:40 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of School of Architecture