Personal recovery and involuntary mental health admissions: the importance of control, relationships and hope

Wyder, Marianne, Bland, Robert and Crompton, David (2013) Personal recovery and involuntary mental health admissions: the importance of control, relationships and hope. Health, 5 3A: 574-581. doi:10.4236/health.2013.53A076

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Author Wyder, Marianne
Bland, Robert
Crompton, David
Title Personal recovery and involuntary mental health admissions: the importance of control, relationships and hope
Journal name Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1949-4998
1949-5005
Publication date 2013-03-26
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4236/health.2013.53A076
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 3A
Start page 574
End page 581
Total pages 8
Place of publication Irvine, CA, United States
Publisher Scientific Research Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Involuntary mental health admissions remain a highly contested area in law, policy and practice. There are growing concerns about the effectiveness and potential harms of using coercion to enable treatment. These concerns are heightened by the worldwide shift to recovery oriented care, which emphasizes the importance for mental health consumers experiencing self- sufficiency, control and having input into their own treatment. Involuntary treatment challenges these very principles.

Methods: For this study we adapted Noblit and Hare Meta Ethnography methods and synthesized the themes of seven qualitative studies which focused on the experiences of involuntary mental health admission.

Results: Seven overarching dimensions were identified as either hindering or facilitating recovery, namely: 1) having input into own treatment; 2) shared humanity; 3) power imbalance/ balance; 4) freedom and control; 5) ability/inability to incorporate the episode/experience; 6) treatment factors; and 7) importance of relationships.

Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that the recovery framework, in particular the concepts of hope, relationships and control are very relevant in the context of involuntary settings.
Keyword Mental health
Recovery framework
Users’ experiences
Involuntary treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Mar 2013, 12:31:44 EST by Dr Marianne Wyder on behalf of School of Social Science