Estimating the total incidence of kidney failure in australia including individuals who are not treated by dialysis or transplantation

Sparke, Claire, Moon, Lynelle, Green, Frances, Mathew, Tim, Cass, Alan, Chadban, Steve, Chapman, Jeremy, Hoy, Wendy and McDonald, Stephen (2013) Estimating the total incidence of kidney failure in australia including individuals who are not treated by dialysis or transplantation. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 61 3: 413-419. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2012.10.012

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ294700_fulltext.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 240.54KB 154

Author Sparke, Claire
Moon, Lynelle
Green, Frances
Mathew, Tim
Cass, Alan
Chadban, Steve
Chapman, Jeremy
Hoy, Wendy
McDonald, Stephen
Title Estimating the total incidence of kidney failure in australia including individuals who are not treated by dialysis or transplantation
Journal name American Journal of Kidney Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0272-6386
Publication date 2013-03
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1053/j.ajkd.2012.10.012
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 61
Issue 3
Start page 413
End page 419
Total pages 7
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: To date, incidence data for kidney failure in Australia have been available for only those who start renal replacement therapy (RRT). Information about the total incidence of kidney failure, including non–RRT-treated cases, is important to help understand the burden of kidney failure in the community and the characteristics of patients who die without receiving treatment.

Study Design: Data linkage study of national observational data sets.

Setting & Participants: All incident treated cases recorded in the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA) probabilistically linked to incident untreated kidney failure cases derived from national death registration data for 2003-2007.

Predictor: Age, sex, and year.

Outcomes: Kidney failure, a combination of incident RRT or death attributed to kidney failure (without RRT).

Measurements: Total incidence of kidney failure (treated and untreated) and treatment rates.

Results: There were 21,370 incident cases of kidney failure in 2003-2007. The incidence rate was 20.9/100,000 population (95% CI, 18.3-24.0) and was significantly higher among older people and males (26.1/100,000 population; 95% CI, 22.5-30.0) compared with females (17.0/100,000 population; 95% CI, 14.9-19.2). There were similars number of treated (10,949) and untreated (10,421) cases, but treatment rates were influenced highly by age. More than 90% of cases in all age groups between 5 and 60 years were treated, but this percentage decreased sharply for older people; only 4% of cases in persons 85 years or older were treated (ORs for no treatment of 115 [95% CI, 118-204] for men ≥80 years and 400 [95% CI, 301-531] for women ≥80 years compared with women who were <50 years).

Limitations: Cross-sectional design, reliance on accurate coding of kidney failure in death registration data.

Conclusions: Almost all Australians who develop kidney failure at younger than 60 years receive RRT, but treatment rates decrease substantially above that age.
Keyword Kidney failure
Incidence
Treated
Untreated
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 23 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 24 Mar 2013, 01:04:28 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service