The impact of various methods of wave transfers from deep water to nearshore when determining extreme beach erosion

Callaghan, David P. and Wainwright, David (2013) The impact of various methods of wave transfers from deep water to nearshore when determining extreme beach erosion. Coastal Engineering, 74 50-58. doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2012.12.001


Author Callaghan, David P.
Wainwright, David
Title The impact of various methods of wave transfers from deep water to nearshore when determining extreme beach erosion
Journal name Coastal Engineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-3839
1872-7379
Publication date 2013-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2012.12.001
Volume 74
Start page 50
End page 58
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Several levels of increasing complexity of transferring wave information from offshore to nearshore have been studied to quantify their influence on extreme beach erosion estimates. Beach profiles which have been monitored since 1976 were used to estimate extreme beach erosion and compared to predictions. Examination of the wave propagation assumptions revolves around two types of offshore to nearshore transfer: excluding or including wave breaking and bottom friction. A second complication is whether still water level variations (ocean tide plus storm surge) are included.The inclusion of various combinations of wave propagation processes other than shoaling and refraction in the wave transfer function changes on the extreme erosion distribution tail through lowering estimates above one year return period. This brings the predicted tails closer to the observations, but does not capture the upper limit of storm demand implied by the extensive beach profile data set. Including wave breaking has a marked effect on probabilistic estimates of beach erosion. The inclusion of bottom friction is less significant. The inclusion of still water level variability in the wave transfer calculation had minimal impact on results for the case study site, where waves were transferred from offshore to water at 20. m depth. These changes were put into perspective by comparing them to changes resulting from limiting beach erosion by adjusting the statistical distributions of peak wave height and storm duration to have maximum limits. We conclude that the proposed improvements on wave transformation methods are as significant as limiting wave erosion potential and worth including.
Keyword Extreme beach erosion
Statistics
Probability
Wave modelling
Coastal management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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