General self-efficacy influences affective task reactions during a work simulation: the temporal effects of changes in workload at different levels of control

Parker, Stacey L., Jimmieson, Nerina L. and Johnson, Kathryn M. (2013) General self-efficacy influences affective task reactions during a work simulation: the temporal effects of changes in workload at different levels of control. Anxiety Stress and Coping, 26 2: 217-239. doi:10.1080/10615806.2011.651616


Author Parker, Stacey L.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Johnson, Kathryn M.
Title General self-efficacy influences affective task reactions during a work simulation: the temporal effects of changes in workload at different levels of control
Journal name Anxiety Stress and Coping   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1061-5806
1477-2205
Publication date 2013-03-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10615806.2011.651616
Volume 26
Issue 2
Start page 217
End page 239
Total pages 23
Place of publication Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study investigated the effects of workload, control, and general self-efficacy on affective task reactions (i.e., demands-ability fit, active coping, and anxiety) during a work simulation. The main goals were (1) to determine the extent general self-efficacy moderates the effects of demand and control on affective task reactions and (2) to determine if this varies as a function of changes in workload. Participants (N=141) completed an inbox activity under conditions of low or high control and within low and high workload conditions. The order of trials varied so that workload increased or decreased. Results revealed individuals with high general self-efficacy reported better demands-abilities fit and active coping as well as less anxiety. Three interactive effects were found. First, it was found that high control increased demands-abilities fit from trial 1 to trial 2, but only when workload decreased. Second, it was found that low efficacious individuals active coping increased in trial 2, but only under high control. Third, it was found that high control helped high efficacious individuals manage anxiety when workload decreased. However, for individuals with low general self-efficacy, neither high nor low control alleviated anxiety (i.e., whether workload increased or decreased over time).
Keyword Workload
Control
General self-efficacy
Anxiety
Coping
Person-environment fit
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 1 February 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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