Rat meets iRat

Wiles, Janet, Heath, Scott, Ball, David, Quinn, Laleh and Chiba, Andrea (2012). Rat meets iRat. In: 2012 IEEE International Conference On Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (Icdl). IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (ICDL), San Diego, Ca, (6400870.1-6400870.2). 7-9 November 2012. doi:10.1109/DevLrn.2012.6400870


Author Wiles, Janet
Heath, Scott
Ball, David
Quinn, Laleh
Chiba, Andrea
Title of paper Rat meets iRat
Conference name IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (ICDL)
Conference location San Diego, Ca
Conference dates 7-9 November 2012
Proceedings title 2012 IEEE International Conference On Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (Icdl)
Journal name 2012 IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics, ICDL 2012
Place of Publication Piscataway NJ, United States
Publisher IEEE
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1109/DevLrn.2012.6400870
ISBN 9781467349642
146734964X
9781467349635
1467349631
Start page 6400870.1
End page 6400870.2
Total pages 2
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Biorobotics has the potential to provide an integrated understanding from neural systems to behavior that is neither ethical nor technically feasible with living systems. Robots that can interact with animals in their natural environment open new possibilities for empirical studies in neuroscience. However, designing a robot that can interact with a rodent requires considerations that span a range of disciplines. For the rat's safety, the body form and movements of the robot need to take into consideration the safety of the animal, an appropriate size for the rodent arenas, and behaviors for interaction. For the robot's safety, its form must be robust in the face of typically inquisitive and potentially aggressive behaviors by the rodent, which can include chewing on exposed parts, including electronics, and deliberate or accidental fouling. We designed a rat-sized robot, the iRat (intelligent rat animat technology) for studies in neuroscience. The iRat is about the same size as a rat and has the ability to navigate autonomously around small environments. In this study we report the first interactions between the iRat and real rodents in a free exploration task. Studies with five rats show that the rats and iRat interact safely for both parties.
Keyword bio-robotics
rodent-robot interactions
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number 6400870

 
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