Spatial analysis of community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in Queensland, Australia

Marquess, John, Hu, Wenbiao, Nimmo, Graeme R. and Clements, Archie C. A. (2013) Spatial analysis of community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in Queensland, Australia. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 34 3: 291-298. doi:10.1086/669522


Author Marquess, John
Hu, Wenbiao
Nimmo, Graeme R.
Clements, Archie C. A.
Title Spatial analysis of community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in Queensland, Australia
Formatted title
Spatial analysis of community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in Queensland, Australia
Journal name Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0899-823X
1559-6834
Publication date 2013-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/669522
Volume 34
Issue 3
Start page 291
End page 298
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: To investigate and describe the relationship between indigenous Australian populations, residential aged care services, and community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) among patients admitted to public hospitals in Queensland, Australia.

Design: Ecological study.

Methods: We used administrative healthcare data linked to microbiology results from patients with SAB admitted to Queensland public hospitals from 2005 through 2010 to identify community-onset infections. Data about indigenous Australian population and residential aged care services at the local government area level were obtained from the Queensland Office of Economic and Statistical Research. Associations between community-onset SAB and indigenous Australian population and residential aged care services were calculated using Poisson regression models in a Bayesian framework. Choropleth maps were used to describe the spatial patterns of SAB risk.

Results: We observed a 21% increase in relative risk (RR) of bacteremia with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA; RR, 1.21 [95% credible interval, 1.15-1.26]) and a 24% increase in RR with nonmultiresistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (nmMRSA; RR, 1.24 [95% credible interval, 1.13-1.34]) with a 10% increase in the indigenous Australian population proportion. There was no significant association between RR of SAB and the number of residential aged care services. Areas with the highest RR for nmMRSA and MSSA bacteremia were identified in the northern and western regions of Queensland.

Conclusions: The RR of community-onset SAB varied spatially across Queensland. There was increased RR of community-onset SAB with nmMRSA and MSSA in areas of Queensland with increased indigenous population proportions. Additional research should be undertaken to understand other factors that increase the risk of infection due to this organism.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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