Leaping off the track: comparing the experiences of first jobs of young people living in disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Britain

Tomaszewski, Wojtek and Cebulla, Andreas (2012). Leaping off the track: comparing the experiences of first jobs of young people living in disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Britain. In: The Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference (TASA 2012), Brisbane, Australia, (). 26-29 November 2012.

Author Tomaszewski, Wojtek
Cebulla, Andreas
Title of paper Leaping off the track: comparing the experiences of first jobs of young people living in disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Britain
Conference name The Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference (TASA 2012)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 26-29 November 2012
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Oral presentation
Open Access Status
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This paper draws on an analysis of one of the UK’s most prominent longitudinal datasets: the British Household Panel Survey. The panel was used to enquire about, and track the realisation of, job aspirations of young people born in the early 1980s and entering the workforce in the 2000s. The study compared the aspirations of young people growing up in socio-economically disadvantaged areas with those growing up in non-disadvantaged areas. The analysis confirmed strong differences in the occupational preferences and choices of young people in these two types of areas. Young people in disadvantaged areas more often sought manual occupations, often following their parents’ example; they were also more likely to become unemployed, reflecting economic tertiarisation and decreasing availability of manual jobs in those areas. However, the study also found evidence of young people from disadvantaged areas using repeated changes in jobs to achieve employment in higher-level occupations, which was related to greater job satisfaction. The same was not the case for young people in non-disadvantaged areas. The research demonstrated that growing up in disadvantaged areas did not prevent the proactive construction of career biographies per se, but it required greater effort, exposing additional barriers to job satisfaction.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes The Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference 2012 was a joint event including both TASA and the Sociological Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (SAANZ), including a special trans-Tasman plenary session. This paper was presented orally at the conference, and not published in the proceedings.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 14 Mar 2013, 10:07:41 EST by Dr Wojtek Tomaszewski on behalf of ISSR - Research Groups