Social work with marginalised people who have a mild or borderline intellectual disability: practicing gentleness and encouraging hope

Ellem, Kathy, O'Connor, Morrie, Wilson, Jill and Williams, Sue (2013) Social work with marginalised people who have a mild or borderline intellectual disability: practicing gentleness and encouraging hope. Australian Social Work, 66 1: 56-71. doi:10.1080/0312407X.2012.710244

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Author Ellem, Kathy
O'Connor, Morrie
Wilson, Jill
Williams, Sue
Title Social work with marginalised people who have a mild or borderline intellectual disability: practicing gentleness and encouraging hope
Journal name Australian Social Work   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0312-407X
1447-0748
Publication date 2013-03
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0312407X.2012.710244
Open Access Status
Volume 66
Issue 1
Start page 56
End page 71
Total pages 16
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic., Australia
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract People with mild or borderline intellectual disabilities are a group of people who usually do not meet the eligibility criteria for specialist disability services, yet are high users of many generalist services, such as mental health, child protection, and criminal justice systems. They may traverse many services, often entering, exiting, and returning to the same service providers with few positive results. This article explores the practice approach of the Meryton Association, a medium-sized nongovernment agency located in Brisbane, Australia. The Meryton Association provides social work support to people with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities, actively assisting this group to build relationships, resources, knowledge, and autonomy in their everyday lives. Using qualitative in-depth interviews with Meryton Association staff and secondary analysis of Meryton Association policy and practice documents, the challenges and opportunities of using this practice approach have been documented. The article proposes that specialist services are needed that use a developmental approach, stress the importance of relationship, and the need to practice gentleness and hope in social worker-client interaction.
Keyword Disability
Practice research
Social work
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Version of record first published: 13 Nov 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 13 Mar 2013, 09:28:42 EST by Jill Wilson on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services