Leading the call for "one vote and no more": Emma Miller (1839-1917)

Jordan, Deborah (2012). Leading the call for "one vote and no more": Emma Miller (1839-1917). In: Rosemary Francis, Patricia Grimshaw and Ann Standish, Seizing the Initiative: Women Leaders in Politics, Workplaces and Communities. Women, Leadership and Democracy in Australia National Conference, Canberra, Australia, (50-60). 1-2 December 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Jordan, Deborah
Title of paper Leading the call for "one vote and no more": Emma Miller (1839-1917)
Conference name Women, Leadership and Democracy in Australia National Conference
Conference location Canberra, Australia
Conference dates 1-2 December 2011
Proceedings title Seizing the Initiative: Women Leaders in Politics, Workplaces and Communities
Place of Publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher eScholarship Research Centre, The University of Melbourne
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780734047977
Editor Rosemary Francis
Patricia Grimshaw
Ann Standish
Start page 50
End page 60
Total pages 11
Total chapters 29
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Emma Miller’s crucial contribution to democratic processes in Australia was through her steadfast commitment to one person one vote, in her leadership at the intersection of the women’s political movement and the emerging labour movement in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Queensland. Revisiting Pam Young’s seminal biography Proud to be a Rebel, Emma Miller’s early Chartist and Unitarian background, her marriages, her family and emigration, and her work as a ‘tailoress’ can be framed in the context of her emergence as a leader through the women’s trade union movement. As the long-term president of the Women’s Equal Franchise Association, she opposed the property vote and worked with the emerging, and successful, Labor Party. Her courageous, popular and political leadership (as made evident in the 1912 General Strike) highlight her capacity as an inspired politician and gifted speaker, one of a bevy of talented Australian women of that era excluded from the houses of parliament because of their gender.
Keyword Emma Miller
Queensland
Labour movement
Labor Party
Women’s suffrage
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
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