Prevalence and determinants of complementary and alternative medicine use during pregnancy: results from a nationally representative sample of Australian pregnant women

Frawley, Jane, Adams, Jon, Sibbritt, David, Steel, Amie, Broom, Alex and Gallois, Cindy (2013) Prevalence and determinants of complementary and alternative medicine use during pregnancy: results from a nationally representative sample of Australian pregnant women. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 53 4: 347-352. doi:10.1111/ajo.12056


Author Frawley, Jane
Adams, Jon
Sibbritt, David
Steel, Amie
Broom, Alex
Gallois, Cindy
Title Prevalence and determinants of complementary and alternative medicine use during pregnancy: results from a nationally representative sample of Australian pregnant women
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8666
1479-828X
Publication date 2013-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ajo.12056
Volume 53
Issue 4
Start page 347
End page 352
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Pregnant women have been identified as high users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, no research to date has provided a detailed analysis of the prevalence and determinants of CAM consumption amongst pregnant women.

Aim: To examine the prevalence and determinants of CAM use by pregnant women, utilising a national representative sample.

Methods: The study sample was obtained via the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. This paper is based on a sub-study of 1,835 pregnant women, administered in 2010. The women answered questions about CAM use, demographics, pregnancy-related health concerns and health service utilisation.

Results: Complementary and alternative medicine use was found to be high with 48.1% (n = 623) of pregnant women consulting a CAM practitioner and 52.0% (n = 842) of women using CAM products (excluding vitamins and minerals) during pregnancy. CAM practitioner visits were more likely for selected pregnancy-related health concerns, namely back pain or back ache, neck pain and labour preparation. Women were less likely to consult a CAM practitioner if they suffered with headaches/migraines. Employment was also found to be predictive of pregnant women's visits to a CAM practitioner. Significant health history and demographic predictors of CAM product use were tiredness and fatigue, embarking on preparation for labour and having a university education.

Conclusion:
Most pregnant women are utilising CAM products and/or services as part of their maternity care and obstetricians, general practitioners and midwives need to enquire with women in their care about possible CAM use to help promote safe, effective coordinated maternity care.
Keyword Complementary and alternative medicine
Maternity care
Pregnancy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 29 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 35 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 11 Mar 2013, 21:36:58 EST by Associate Professor Alexander Broom on behalf of School of Social Science