What do you see when you look at me? Detection and identification: differences between closed-mouth and open-mouth stimuli

Wakefield, Louise (2012). What do you see when you look at me? Detection and identification: differences between closed-mouth and open-mouth stimuli Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Wakefield, Louise
Thesis Title What do you see when you look at me? Detection and identification: differences between closed-mouth and open-mouth stimuli
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Ottmar Lipp
Total pages 80
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The current study looks at preferential processing of photographic emotional expression stimuli and sex of poser via detection and identification tasks. A series of computer-based visual tasks were under taken to look further into current literature patterns of results and compare the differences of closed-mouth and open-mouth stimuli. Experiment 1 examined detection and identification of closed-mouth stimuli for happy, sad, angry and disgust emotional face expressions. Results indicated happy emotional expressions were preferentially detected compared to sad, angry and disgust emotional expressions. For the identification task happy and to a lesser extent sad emotional expressions were preferentially identified compared to sad, angry and disgust emotional expressions. Happy and sad emotional expressions were preferentially identified in the female poser condition compared the male poser condition. Experiment 2 repeated experiment 1 utilizing open-mouth stimuli. No significant differences resulted for the detection task. For the identification task happy emotional expressions were preferentially processed compared with sad, angry and disgust emotional expressions with disgust resulting in slower reaction times than angry emotional expressions and more errors than sad and angry emotional expressions. Preferential identification of sad emotional expressions were observed for the female poser condition and angry for the male poser condition. A follow-up task comparing the results of experiment 1 and 2 revealed no differences in between experiments for the detection task. The follow-up for the identification task comparison revealed faster identification of open-mouth stimuli for happy and angry emotional expressions compared to closed-mouth stimuli with fewer errors for angry and sad emotional expressions. The current thesis results suggest partial support for preferential processing differences between the emotional expressions due to closed-mouth and open-mouth regions of the face. Limitations of the current study and future directions are discussed.
Keyword Detection and identification
Closed-mouth and open-mouth stimuli

 
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Created: Mon, 11 Mar 2013, 11:15:01 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology