Understanding the ‘i’ in iGambling: what psychosocial predictors distinguish young Australian internet gamblers?

Von Drehnen, Erin (2012). Understanding the ‘i’ in iGambling: what psychosocial predictors distinguish young Australian internet gamblers? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
VON_DREHNENErin4071thesis2012.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 4.94MB 8
Author Von Drehnen, Erin
Thesis Title Understanding the ‘i’ in iGambling: what psychosocial predictors distinguish young Australian internet gamblers?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Judith Griffiths
Total pages 141
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Due to the growing popularity of internet gambling and the risks specific to the online gambling environment, it is important to assess potential differences between those who gamble using traditional land-based activities to those who gamble using the internet. A cross-sectional survey underpinned by the theory of planned behaviour (Ajzen & Madden, 1986) was used to investigate the psychosocial determinants of gambling in young Australians aged 18 to 35 years (N = 189). The focal predictors included gambling attitudes, perceived social acceptance of gambling, perceived gambling self-efficacy and locus of control, gambling frequency, problem gambling risk, and gambling intention. The study compared gamblers (n = 107) to non-gamblers (n = 81), and traditional gamblers (n = 91) to internet gamblers (n = 16). Gamblers were more likely to have positive attitudes towards gambling and higher gambling self-efficacy than non-gamblers, with internet gamblers more likely to have positive gambling attitudes, stronger perception of social acceptance towards gambling, and higher risk gambling. Higher gambling frequency was associated with stronger views of social acceptance towards gambling, greater endorsement of chance control, higher gambling risk, intending to gamble, and being an internet gambler. Importantly, Internet gamblers were found to be more likely problem and moderate risk gamblers than traditional gamblers. These findings support the need for research to differentiate between people who gamble traditionally and using the internet. Further, these findings can be translated into practical strategies to reduce the potential harms associated with internet gambling and higher risk gambling.
Keyword Psychosocial predictors
Internet gamblers

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 11 Mar 2013, 11:08:15 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology