Preliminary investigations indicate that the lack of growth in Indonesian goat consumption is linked to negative perceptions of goat meat

Murray-Prior, R., Natsir, A., Asja, M. A., Nasrullah, Murray, P. J., Yusmasari and Nurhayu, A. (2013) Preliminary investigations indicate that the lack of growth in Indonesian goat consumption is linked to negative perceptions of goat meat. Animal Production Science, 53 3: 256-264. doi:10.1071/AN12093


Author Murray-Prior, R.
Natsir, A.
Asja, M. A.
Nasrullah
Murray, P. J.
Yusmasari
Nurhayu, A.
Title Preliminary investigations indicate that the lack of growth in Indonesian goat consumption is linked to negative perceptions of goat meat
Journal name Animal Production Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1836-0939
1836-5787
Publication date 2013-01-14
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AN12093
Volume 53
Issue 3
Start page 256
End page 264
Total pages 9
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC., Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The present paper discusses goat consumption by consumers in Makassar, Indonesia, on the basis of interviews with households from April to May 2009, using a survey that included questions on criteria for purchasing meat, attitudes to goat meat, goat and goat-meat purchases and consumption, and demographics of the respondents. Consumers rarely bought goat or goat meat for family, visitors or gifts and most commonly bought it for religious and birth ceremonies. Cluster analysis identified four consumer segments that were not significantly correlated with demographic variables but were with purchasing patterns and the likelihood of increasing consumption. The evidence supports the hypothesis that goat meat is consumed mainly for cultural ceremonies and that the reason for the lack of growth in consumption of goat meat is negative perceptions of many consumers about its effects on their health.
Keyword Attitudes
Hypertension
Muslim
Fresh Meat
Boer Goats
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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